Posts Tagged ‘money management’

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The 5 Skills: Learning by Earning

February 3, 2014

By Krista Park, Communications & Marketing Director

Every winter here at Girl Scouts – NC Coastal Pines we celebrate the biggest girl-led business in the world that generates almost $800 million in annual sales – the Girl Scout Cookie Program. Girls sell over 200 million cookie packages a year to more than 50 million cookie customers.

And these aren’t just cookies – they’re opportunities! When girls participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Sale program, they learn by earning.   Girls learn five essential skills by selling Girl Scout cookies. The program’s 5 Skills help them achieve their goals and pave the way for a lifetime of success.

Skill #1 – Business Ethics

Girls act honestly and responsibly during every step of the cookie sale. This matters because employers want to hire ethical employees—and the world needs ethical leaders in every field.  

Skill #2 – People Skills

Girls learn how to talk (and listen!) to their customers, as well as learning how to work as a team with other girls. This matters because it helps them do better in school (on group projects, on sports teams, and on the playground) and, later, at work.

Skill #3 – Money Management

Girls develop a budget, take cookie orders, and handle customers’ money. This matters because girls need to know how to handle money—from their lunch money to their allowance to (someday) their paycheck.

Skill #4 – Decision Making

Girls decide where and when to sell cookies, how to market their sale, and what to do with their earnings. This matters because girls must make many decisions, big and small, in their lives. Learning this skill helps them make good ones.

Skill #5 – Goal Setting

Girls set cookie sales goals and, with their team, create a plan to reach them. This matters because girls need to know how to set and reach goals to succeed in school, on the job, and in life.

Why do these 5 Skills matter?

Because when your Girl Scout has learned these skills, she’ll be poised for success in her career. Think about it – when employers interview job candidates, they all look for the same things. This is true whether the employer is a bank, high-tech company, university, hospital, publishing house, car dealership, accounting firm—or even the local pet store!

They want someone who can set goals and meet deadlines. Someone who works well with others.  Someone who understands customers. Someone who can influence others. Someone who is honest, trustworthy, and reliable.

Sound like anyone you know? That’s your Girl Scout, using the 5 Skills she learned in the Girl Scout Cookie Program.

5 Business Skills

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Having It All

May 6, 2013

By Krista Park, Communications & Marketing Director

Girls today reflect a new generation of financially empowered and independent citizens. An overwhelming majority of girls feel gender is not a barrier to what they can accomplish financially. But is the world ready to support today’s girls?

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As it now stands, students receive little financial education at school and have repeatedly failed broad tests measuring their mastery of basic personal finance and economic concepts. Just 14 states require high schools to offer a course in personal finance, according to the Council for Economic Education, and even fewer require students to take such a course in order to graduate.

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In an ever-changing economy and world, financial skills are leadership skills. As the premier leadership organization for girls, Girl Scouts NC Coastal Pines helps girls build financial experience, confidence, and independence by providing them with resources focused on everything from saving money, developing strong credit, and minimizing debt, to philanthropic giving and financing their dreams.

Women now represent half of the workforce in the United States, and more than half of the country’s college students and graduates are women. Thus, the potential for women to hold leadership positions in business, entertainment, academia, and politics is high.

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But while progress has been made, there is still a shortage of women in leadership roles. As of 2012, women made up 18.3 percent of the U.S. Congress, and 23.4 percent of statewide elective executive offices. Only 3.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs were women, and women made up 16.6 percent of corporate boards.

Girl Scouts is committing to the financial empowerment of all girls. Our shift from simple fundraising to financial education has been underway for some time and continues to bolster the relevance of Girl Scouting to today’s girls. The current economic recession and resulting awareness of how important financial literacy is for all youth—especially girls—has given our approach a real charge.

According to the Girl Scout Research Institute study Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy, girls are quite clear that they need and want financial literacy skills to help them achieve their dreams, with 90 percent saying it is important for them to learn how to manage money. However, just 12 percent of girls surveyed feel confident in making financial decisions.

It is up to all of us at Girl Scouts – North Carolina Pines to ensure today’s girls are developing the financial savvy, business skills, and innovative thinking that will position them to be leaders in their own lives and in the world at large.

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Please join us in helping girls be prepared for their futures.

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