Posts Tagged ‘Making a Difference’

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Generations of Impact: How 25 years of services led to $20,000 for girls

June 11, 2014

Emily Hill, Director of Individual Giving

Girl Scouts Pinning AlumnaeThe day before Mothers’ Day had me driving up to Annapolis, Maryland for a very special reason. Friends of Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines, Bob Schmitz and Amy Csorba, had made a gift in honor or Amy’s 80-year-old mother, Sue, and we were about to surprise her with a small celebration in her honor.

The story of this visit traces back to Amy and Bob sorting through Mrs. Csorba’s things after the death of her husband in January 2014. Among the many family heirlooms, Amy found photographs, mementos, and badges – Girl Scout memorabilia that reminded Amy of her mother’s passion for the organization.

Sue “Skipper” Csorba was a Girl Scout leader in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s in Annapolis. During her almost 25 years of involvement, Sue led her daughters’ troops and later helped other troops organize camping, hiking, and outdoor adventures. She served with a cadre of co-leaders, many of whom were to join us in the celebration.

Honoring Sue’s passion to provide outdoor experiences for all girls was very important to Bob and Amy. Sue was committed to giving girls outdoor experiences, and determined to have an inclusive troop of girls from all races, incomes, and family situations – even going so far as to provide transportation to girls who needed it. With a $20,000 gift, Bob and Amy established the Sue “Skipper” Csorba Scholarship Fund to send 80 girls to NC Coastal Pines summer camps over the next 10 years. These full scholarships would go to girls with the greatest financial need, and preference would be made for girls who had never been to camp before.

Sue now lives in a retirement community, outside of Annapolis, where the celebration was to be held. The small gathering included the family, co-leaders from Sue’s troops, and friends from the Central Maryland Girl Scout Council.

proclamationMany tears were shed and memories shared, as the scrapbooks and memorabilia were passed around. My favorite was an official proclamation written to look like the Declaration of Independence by Troop 231 in 1967 that claimed Sue to be the GREATEST Girl Scout Leader A Girl Ever Had. The proclamation goes on to say:

“She taught us all about arts & crafts, first aid, singing, dancing, hiking, nature trails, the fun of camping, and the good feelings of sharing a campfire with friends. She brought out the best in us, as an individual and as a member of a troop and prepared us to do our best as we grew to adulthood. Her actions exemplified the ideals of the Girl Scout Motto & Laws, to her troop and to the community.”

With these summer camp scholarships, Sue will continue to make a big impact on girls for many more years. We are so grateful to her, to Bob and Amy, and to all the Girl Scout leaders who help grow our girls into amazing women.

To make a gift in honor of the leader that inspired you, or to find out more about the Sue “Skipper” Csorba Scholarship Fund, please contact me via email or 1-800-284-4475. Thanks.

 

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Going Gold – Making a Difference in the World

July 31, 2013

By Krista Park, Communications & Marketing Director

Each year, girls who Go Gold demonstrate extraordinary leadership through individual Take Action projects that provide a sustainable, lasting benefit to their larger community. Since 1916, girls have successfully answered the call to Go Gold, an act that forever marks them as accomplished members of their communities and the world.  During 2012, Girl Scouts – NC Coastal Pines was proud to bestow the Girl Scout Gold Award on 43 girls.

The Girl Scout Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting.  This past July, Girl Scouts – NC Coastal Pines honored the 2012 Gold Award recipients at three Gold Award receptions across our council region. These receptions, sponsored by Wells Fargo Insurance Services, celebrated these accomplished Girl Scouts who achieved their goals and this distinguished honor all while serving their communities. Each Awardee also received a special Girl Scout Gold Award bracelet with a commemorative 100th anniversary charm.

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The Gold Award project fulfills a need within a girl’s community (whether local or global), creates change, and is sustainable.  The project is more than a good service project— it encompasses organizational, leadership, and networking skills.  Media literacy, exercise and healthy living, nutrition and childhood obesity, immigration and access to education, economic development, childhood depression, and public safety were among the community issues addressed by the 2012 awardees.  To read more about each Girl Scout Gold Awardee and her project, view our interactive 2012 Girl Scout Gold Awards booklet.

Here are 10 impressive facts about the Girl Scout Gold Award:

  1. Approximately one million Girl Scouts have earned the Gold Award or its equivalent since 1916.
  2. Awarded to fewer than six percent of Girl Scouts annually, each Gold Awardee spends one to two years on her project.
  3. In 2010, the average age of recipients was 17 years old.
  4. Gold Award projects involve eight steps: identifying an issue; investigating it thoroughly; inviting others to participate and building a team; creating a plan; presenting your plan; gathering feedback; taking action; and educating and inspiring others.
  5. 80 hours is the suggested minimum hours of service for Gold Award projects.
  6. A number of college scholarship opportunities await girls who have earned their Girl Scout Gold Award.
  7. In recognition of their achievements, Gold Awardees who join the armed services enter at one rank higher than other recruits.
  8. Gold Award alumnae are more successful in school, develop a stronger sense of self, and report greater satisfaction with life than their peers.
  9. Gold Award recipients have a built-in sisterhood. They join networks of Gold Award recipients and become role models to other girls.
  10. Girl Scout Gold Award projects create lasting change.

Girl Scouts – NC Coastal Pines takes great pride in recognizing the outstanding accomplishments of the 43 young women who achieved their goals to earn the Girl Scout Gold Award during the 2012 Girl Scout award year.   Congratulations to all of our 2012 Girl Scout Gold Awardees!

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