Archive for the ‘Advocacy’ Category

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Having It All

May 6, 2013

By Krista Park, Communications & Marketing Director

Girls today reflect a new generation of financially empowered and independent citizens. An overwhelming majority of girls feel gender is not a barrier to what they can accomplish financially. But is the world ready to support today’s girls?

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As it now stands, students receive little financial education at school and have repeatedly failed broad tests measuring their mastery of basic personal finance and economic concepts. Just 14 states require high schools to offer a course in personal finance, according to the Council for Economic Education, and even fewer require students to take such a course in order to graduate.

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In an ever-changing economy and world, financial skills are leadership skills. As the premier leadership organization for girls, Girl Scouts NC Coastal Pines helps girls build financial experience, confidence, and independence by providing them with resources focused on everything from saving money, developing strong credit, and minimizing debt, to philanthropic giving and financing their dreams.

Women now represent half of the workforce in the United States, and more than half of the country’s college students and graduates are women. Thus, the potential for women to hold leadership positions in business, entertainment, academia, and politics is high.

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But while progress has been made, there is still a shortage of women in leadership roles. As of 2012, women made up 18.3 percent of the U.S. Congress, and 23.4 percent of statewide elective executive offices. Only 3.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs were women, and women made up 16.6 percent of corporate boards.

Girl Scouts is committing to the financial empowerment of all girls. Our shift from simple fundraising to financial education has been underway for some time and continues to bolster the relevance of Girl Scouting to today’s girls. The current economic recession and resulting awareness of how important financial literacy is for all youth—especially girls—has given our approach a real charge.

According to the Girl Scout Research Institute study Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy, girls are quite clear that they need and want financial literacy skills to help them achieve their dreams, with 90 percent saying it is important for them to learn how to manage money. However, just 12 percent of girls surveyed feel confident in making financial decisions.

It is up to all of us at Girl Scouts – North Carolina Pines to ensure today’s girls are developing the financial savvy, business skills, and innovative thinking that will position them to be leaders in their own lives and in the world at large.

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Please join us in helping girls be prepared for their futures.

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Celebrating our 101st Birthday with the NC General Assembly

March 20, 2013

By Lisa Jones, Chief Executive Officer

The Girl Scout Proclamation read in the NC House Gallery on March 12, 2013.

The Girl Scout Proclamation read in the NC House Gallery on March 12, 2013.

When Girl Scout founder Juliette Gordon Low brought together 18 girls on March 12, 1912, she believed all girls should be given the opportunity to develop physically, mentally and spiritually.   For the past 101 years, Girl Scouting has helped that vision become reality.  Girl Scouts has not only helped shape girls’ personal development, but it has also helped to shape our past, present and future female leaders.

Many successful women got their start in leadership through Girl Scouting.  In fact, fifty-three percent of all women business owners, sixty percent of women serving in Congress, and virtually every female astronaut are Girl Scouts.  This is truly a celebration.

Last week, Low’s vision and these highlights were recognized in the resolutions by both the N.C. House and N.C. Senate proclaiming the week of March 10-16, 2013, as Girl Scout Week.  Recognized annually in March and centered on that first meeting date, Girl Scout Week celebrates and honors Juliette Gordon Low and the great organization she founded.  Our Council works biennially with the N.C. General Assembly to pass resolutions as a way to recognize the contributions Girl Scouting has made on our state and across the county.

It was so powerful to hear the resolutions read aloud in both the senate and house galleries, as the resolutions “honor[ed] the memory of Juliette Gordon Low for her role in founding the Girl Scouts of the USA and expresses appreciation to the members of the Girl Scouts for their commitment to building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place.”

GSNCCP CEO, Lisa Jones, sitting with fellow Girl Scouts as the proclamation is read.

GSNCCP CEO, Lisa Jones, sitting with fellow Girl Scouts as the proclamation is read.

A number of local troops and members joined Girl Scouts – NC Coastal Pines  at the NC State Legislature in downtown Raleigh to receive these Girl Scout Week proclamations.  A Cookies ‘N’ Milk Reception followed the sessions where members enjoyed Girl Scout cookies, of course, with their state senators and local representatives.   Girl Scouts, volunteers and staff from the Girl Scouts – Colonial Coast Council also joined us downtown for this day of advocacy.

We want to especially thank Senator Tamara Barringer, the primary sponsor of Senate Resolution 251, and Representatives Carney, Farmer-Butterfield, Howard, and Hurley, the primary sponsors of House Resolution 275, for their efforts to support and honor the Girl Scouts.  We also appreciate Representative Lewis’ amendment to the House resolution requesting an official copy resolution be sent to both our Council and Girl Scouts of the USA’s headquarters.

For a complete list of sponsors for Senate Resolution 251 and Sponsors for House Resolution 251, see Bill Information on the N.C. General Assembly website.

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